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#5 The old enemy

No, not the English rugby team. I speak, of course, of TIME. “Where does the time go?”, as Sandy Denny asked us back in the day. Fecked if I know dearie. I had such good intentions to blog monthly, but life has been somewhat hectic. I find myself with the space to blog again, in the long dark tea-time of the soul between two events in the Science Gallery, my regular gig. So here I type feverishly with a rare golden hour to spend. Last time I blogged was last May, with Ireland in the convulsions of the 8th amendment referendum campaign. Wow. a lot has happened. I told myself, I’ll wait until I have something to blog about. And then, when I did, I didn’t have time to blog! Or the inclination, in fairness. I signed off then bemoaning that I was still wearing a fleece jacket in mid May. Little was I to know that the country was about to experience its longest and most intense heatwave and drought for 40 years. The grass yellowed, and a few late Skerries summer night’s were had on the harbour and beach. I took time off to celebrate my wife’s 50th birthday. 5 months later, the celebrations seem to be winding down just in time for my Mam’s 70th celebrations, which seem to be taking place over a more sober two month period. Ah sure, go on. Who am I to judge? I get to enjoy a bit of it too. So, in between work, there has been much travel. The first half of the heatwave was spent touring the Donegal coast from Errigal to Rossnowlagh, which felt almost like another planet as we paddled in the warm shore water after 10pm. Hardly time to start retreating inside to blog about it. But I did take some pretty pictures. There was lots of sheep. Other than that, I won’t bore you with the sublimely sunny details.

Rossknowlagh Beach, Co. Donegal

It’s sufficient to say that an extended period of warm sunlight can have a strange effect on the Irish. The national emergency plan for winter storm weather is to buy bread and watch Netflix. For warm sun, which is never guaranteed in the Irish summer, the corresponding plan is t